Workshop Poems

The AHRC sponsored conference ‘Writing into Art’ took place at Strathclyde University and Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery on June 18th and 19th 2013. Among the events that took place was a workshop for poets based in Glasgow led by visiting plenary speaker, Cole Swensen. The poems that are posted below represent some of the work produced in advance of this workshop and constitute responses by the poets to paintings and other artefacts selected by staff at Kelvingrove. The organisers of the conference are very grateful to curator, Anne Wallace and to her staff for helping to facilitate this process. Copyright remains with the poets.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

No Rush

After ‘Seascape’, by L S Lowry

Hush                       hush                       hush                       hush

                                                                                               there’s no

          hsur                       hsur                       hsur                       hsur

                the factory gate

                                     never came today

                    the crowds of late

          appointment keepers

                              are nowhere to be seen

                                                            the only

                                                                           thing that’s bigger

                                                                   than the everyman out here

                                             is the sea that sucks

                                                                           the gravel in

                                                                                          the gravel out

                      through tides’ tight

                                             teeth              sky high

                                                                   sun blinds kites white

theres no

       rush                        rush                        rush                        rush

                                                                                                          knowing the

hsuh                       hsuh                       hsuh                       hsuh

Christie Williamson

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Fulton’s Orrery

the dull metallic sun
its painted planets
clouds of hatpin moons

all this is just a sketch
a fragment

of a clockwork universe
where gears are gravity
equations solved in brass

this is a miniature
sculpted in spacetime;
it cannot be seen at rest.

Claire Quigley

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

In a museum

After the “Honesty Mirror” made by Frances MacDonald in 1896

worn with looking
the mirror is
behind glass

reflections absent
frame without picture
except the light

enclosed by
pewter plants and
women’s hands

fleshless figures
hung with cloth
of metal

tooled faces
long-fingered
maker’s hands

stylized honesty
seeds beneath
pale silvered skin

sexless figures
flowering
hair becoming stems

pointing
to a seed pod
against the sun

tasteless, scentless
untouchable
in beaten tin

the ageing, spotted glass
has a photograph’s
silvered grace

lean in and see
your father’s ghost
in a  weathered window

Ellen McAteer

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Little Brother                                                                         

(painting by Norah Neilson Gray)

It was done as the sun dipped into evening.

A twist of banknotes, the sticky paper

casked by father’s desk,

a nervous transaction

which faded with the light.

After she’d gone, the musk of her

leeched from the oils.

Don’t touch, I told you.

The wool of your little shirt

softened in my hand, your hair

spun barley-sugar. My milky shoulders

pleased me, yet the finishing

made us dumb.

You tired of our silence;

horses and tin soldiers

trumpeted you away.

Glaze, overworked by time

thickened and blushed,

the roses darkened in our memory.

She said shadows have colours too

but what I thought was skill and fold

seems now to show as tears.

Here, in another hallowed place

chance makes a Mary of me.

Pulls yellow into gray,

and your small forgotten spirit,

high upon a quiet wall,

troubles no-one.

Gillean McDougall

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Violets by Stuart Park (Kelvingrove Museum. Glasgow)

Nothing strange

about flowers

drying in a frame,

I believe I christen these chosen colours,

summer night with an indigo heart,

white of blackthorn blossom,

a lens of vase, in antique lace

and watery turquoise, old petals fallen

in pale funerals of blue.

I relax

towards the edges of the frame

glimpse a fraying of plaster

a curl of aging paint,

I am tired of the pictures in this bland cave,

I am so old in images already

- lost happiness, suffering and disdain,

I want to go out

to the world’s weathering,

to the crumbled masonry of ordinary walls

where salt and wind and rain

yield colours without name,

shapes that are the seeds

of new topographies

- An afterlife, an afterart beyond

these open coffins of thin paint,

the beautiful

formalin

of practised eyes.

Geoff Cooper

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

A Window in Glasgow

after Windows in the West (1994) by Avril Paton

i

Look:

violet light

softly reflected by neat

sugar-drift of snow

illuminates

this honeycomb

on the cusp of evening,

Listen:

stored honey

murmurs in holy

tongues

of virtue, value,

models for the faithful.

ii

In the convivial violet glow

guests talk Toshie and Vettriano

charmed by the infinite regress

of reproduced Windows in the West.

iii

We poor shadows on the other side

peeping from a darkened window,

let the artist be our guide,

this is no incidental show.

Come press our noses to the glass;

this is all of honey we need to know.

No one there offers us a glance

yearning outwith the murmuring hive.

Abandon all hope. The honeyed dance

their news of nectar, the honeyed wax and thrive.

William Bonar

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Man In Armour 

(Rembrandt) Kelvingrove Museum

Warrior

A flame makes a Saturn of my head; its jewels were bequeathed by owls. I still consider them an honour. The honeys of valour ring in my ears like bells, they are sweet as wood-smoke, but I am falling; like a shipwreck for an old river. No spaniel or pomegranate to is here to share my fellowship, the armourer is gone, all his metals, spent.  My arms have turned to vaults.  I see the sun shine for chargers orphaned in woods of buttercups, the soil is so porous for fresh game.

Watcher

Her inheritance.  Quiet in the rasp of open hours, she thinks Rothko or Klee. Like finds reclaimed from the sea, she scalpels, curious, takes notes to prove our trigonometry.  By strokes, she becomes, wants to become.  Cow hide, black tulip, wet auburn hair.  It is slow work but restorative; like a shipwright’s cautious craft.  A new altar, there are acres of room inside.

Amy Anderson

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Writing Into Art Programme

WRITING INTO ART

Tuesday 18th June and Wednesday 19th June 2013 Glasgow

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Tuesday, 18th June, University of Strathclyde (Graham Hills Building Conference Suite)

0845 – 0930     Registration and Coffee

0930 – 1030     Plenary: Cole Swensen                     GH514

1030 – 1045     Tom Chambers: Steven Campbell Visual Arts Workshop Information / Introduction

1045 – 1115     Coffee

1115 – 1245     Panel 1:  Chair – Patricia Farrell    GH510

Peter Gillies: ‘Scrawling Across an Open Field: Cy Twombly’s Inverted Ekphrasis’

Stephen Vincent: ‘Visual Art that “reads” poetry’

Simon Perril: ‘Synaptic foliage: Notes towards a poetics of collage as conductive practice (the dialogue between poems and visual collage)’

1115 – 1245     Panel 2:  Chair – Sheree Mack        GH513

Ken Cockburn and ~ in the fields:  ‘Composite Landscapes’

Lesley Harrison: ‘Ecstatics: a language of birds’

Alistair Peebles: ‘Blossom and Farewell’

1245 – 1400     Lunch

1400 – 1530     Panel 3:  Chair – Bryony Stocker    GH510

Linda Carreiro: ‘texte à tissue, text at issue: exploring embodiment in  word-based visual art’

Judy Kendall: ‘Understanding Visual Text: neither a poem nor a painting be’

Patricia Farrell: ‘The Expressive Tension between Text and Painting in the work of Pete Clarke’

1400 -1530      Panel 4:  Chair – Calum Rodger     GH513

Robin Purves: ‘The Reverse of Ekphrasis: Frank O’Hara on Madison Avenue’

Louis Goddard: ‘De Kooning, O’Hara, Prynne: Towards a Poetics of Paint’

Tilo Reifenstein: ‘Transposition Im/Possible’

1530 – 1600:    Tea/Coffee

1600 – 1730     Panel 5:  Chair – Robin Purves       GH510

Juha Virtanen: ‘Memories arrested in space: Eric Mottram’s Pollock Record

Calum Rodger: ‘Writing Between Arts: Ekphrasis in Concrete Poetry’

Jeannette Siebols: ‘Writing the Painting’.

1600 – 1730     Panel 6:  Chair – Judy Kendall       GH513

Mark Leahy: ‘ “it is the act and not the object of perception that matters”: Thomas MacGreevy’s poetry in relation to perception in literary and visual arts’

David Kinloch:  ‘Hide and Seek:  Translation and Ekphrasis’

Sheree Mack: ‘The Black Woman in the View Finder: Reflections on the Visual in the Writing of Contemporary Black British Women Poets’

1800 – 1900     Civic Reception: Glasgow City Chambers, George Square

1930                Conference Dinner: Café Source, 1 St Andrew’s Square

Wednesday 19th June, Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery

Delegates will be able to drop-in on a visual arts workshop for young artists interested in working with text.  It will be led by Tom Chambers MBE and will run throughout the day. Numbers, however, are strictly limited and anyone wishing to register for this workshop should check their availability first with David Kinloch.

0830                  Bus to Kelvingrove from Glasgow George Square

0900 – 0930     Registration and coffee

0930 – 1030     Plenary: David Kennedy, University of Hull  

                            Main Conference Room

‘Ekphrasis, Translation and Utopia’

Drawing on and developing arguments in his recent study The Ekphrastic Encounter in Contemporary British Poetry and Elsewhere (Ashgate, 2012), Kennedy explores how ekphrasis might be understood as a type of translation that, like all translation, is convergent with ideas about utopia.

1030 – 1100     Coffee

1100 – 1230     Panel 7:  Chair – Simon Perrill

Main Conference Room

Lawrence Figgis: ‘ “Something that was not a bird”: The Uses of Transformation in Contemporary Ekphrasis’

Defne Cizakca, Nikki Cameron, Sherezade Garcia Rangel: ‘Writing Hidden Objects: The Hunterian Museum as a Place of Inspiration’

Tracy Mackenna: ‘Peddling Prints and Poems: activating the textual, the oral and the visual’

1100 – 1230     Panel 8:  Chair – Linda Carreiro

North Lunch Room

Andrew Brown: ‘The Fool and the Physician’

Kyra Pollitt: ‘Visual Art as the text for writing into iconotexts? The curious case of sign language poetry’

1230 – 1400     Lunch

1400 – 1600     Poetry Workshop (Cole Swensen) / Visual Arts Workshop (Tom Chambers)

1400 – 1530     Panel 9:  Chair – Alistair Peebles

North Lunch Room

Eddie Tay: ‘In Hong Kong, In Media Res: On Beginnings, Intentions and Methods of an Ongoing Poetry and Street Photography Project’

Christopher Kerr: ‘Ekphrasis and Ian Hamilton Finlay’s “Starlit Waters”

1530                Tea/Coffee

1730                Bus Departing for George Square

 

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PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

WRITING INTO ART 

Tuesday 18th June and Wednesday 19th June 2013 Glasgow

Provisional Programme – Please note this programme is subject to change. A definitive programme will be posted nearer the date of the conference.

Tuesday, 18th June, University of Strathclyde (Graham Hills Building Conference Suite)

0845 – 0930     Registration and Coffee

0930 – 1030     Plenary: Cole Swensen

1030 – 1045     Tom Chambers: Steven Campbell Visual Arts Workshop Information / Introduction

1045 – 1115     Coffee

1115 – 1245     Panel 1

Peter Gillies: ‘Scrawling Across an Open Field: Cy Twombly’s Inverted Ekphrasis’

Stephen Vincent: ‘Visual Art that “reads” poetry’

Simon Perril: ‘Synaptic foliage: Notes towards a poetics of collage as conductive practice (the dialogue between poems and visual collage)’

1115 – 1245     Panel 2

Ken Cockburn and ~ in the fields: ‘Composite Landscapes’

Lesley Harrison: ‘Ecstatics: a language of birds’

Alistair Peebles: ‘Blossom and Farewell’ (Working title)

1245 – 1400     Lunch

1400 – 1530     Panel 3

Linda Carreiro: ‘texte à tissue, text at issue: exploring embodiment in  word-based visual art’

Judy Kendall: ‘Understanding Visual Text: neither a poem nor a painting be’

Patricia Farrell: ‘The Expressive Tension between Text and Painting in the work of Pete Clarke’

1400 -1530      Panel 4

Robin Purves: ‘The Reverse of Ekphrasis: Frank O’Hara on Madison Avenue’

Louis Goddard: ‘De Kooning, O’Hara, Prynne: Towards a Poetics of Paint’

Tilo Reifenstein: ‘Transposition Im/Possible’

1530 – 1600:    Tea/Coffee

1600 – 1730     Panel 5

Juha Virtanen: ‘Memories arrested in space: Eric Mottram’s Pollock Record

Calum Rodger: ‘Writing Between Arts: Ekphrasis in Concrete Poetry’

Jeannette Siebols: ‘Writing the Painting’.

1600 – 1730     Panel 6

Mark Leahy: ‘ “it is the act and not the object of perception that matters”: Thomas MacGreevy’s poetry in relation to perception in literary and visual arts’

John McAuliffe: ‘Hearing Things: Sound and Form in Derek Mahon’s Ekphrastic Poems’

Sheree Mack: ‘The Black Woman in the View Finder: Reflections on the Visual in the Writing of Contemporary Black British Women Poets’

1800 – 1900     Civic Reception: Glasgow City Chambers, George Square

1930                Conference Dinner: Café Source, 1 St Andrew’s Square

Wednesday 19th June, Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery

Delegates will be able to drop-in on a visual arts workshop for young artists interested in working with text or attend -as an observer-  a poetry workshop with local poets lead by Cole Swensen. The visual art workshop will be lead by Tom Chambers MBE and will run throughout the day. Numbers, however, are strictly limited and anyone wishing to register for these workshops should check their availability first with the conference organisers. See ‘Visual Art Workshop‘ page for more details.

0830                Bus to Kelvingrove from Glasgow George Square

0900 – 0930     Registration and coffee

0930 – 1030     Plenary:

David Kennedy, University of Hull: ‘Ekphrasis, Translation and Utopia’:

Drawing on and developing arguments in his recent study The Ekphrastic Encounter in Contemporary British Poetry and Elsewhere (Ashgate, 2012), Kennedy explores how ekphrasis might be understood as a type of translation that, like all translation, is convergent with ideas about utopia.

1030 – 1100     Coffee

1100 – 1230     Panel 7

Lawrence Figgis: ‘ “Something that was not a bird”: The Uses of Transformation in Contemporary Ekphrasis’

Defne Cizakca, Nikki Cameron, Sherezade Garcia Rangel: ‘Writing Hidden Objects: The Hunterian Museum as a Place of Inspiration’

Tracy Mackenna and Edwin Janssen: ‘Peddling Prints and Poems: activating the textual, the oral and the visual’.

1100 – 1230     Panel 8

Andrew Brown: ‘The Fool and the Physician’

Laura Edbrook: I Am Not: Agents in disguise and assigned to discreet inquiries, we occasionally recognise each other

Kyra Pollitt: ‘Visual Art as the text for writing into iconotexts? The curious case of sign language poetry’

1230 – 1400     Lunch

1400 – 1600     Poetry Workshop (Cole Swensen) / Visual Arts Workshop (Tom Chambers)

1400 – 1530     Panel 9

Eddie Tay: ‘In Hong Kong, In Media Res: On Beginnings, Intentions and Methods of an Ongoing Poetry and Street Photography Project’

Christopher Kerr: ‘Ekphrasis and Ian Hamilton Finlay’s “Starlit Waters”

1630                Bus Departing for George Square

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Conference Abstract Titles

Below are the titles of papers proposed and accepted for presentation at this June’s conference. 

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Robin PurvesUniversity of Central Lancashire: “The Reverse of Ekphrasis: Frank O’Hara on Madison Avenue”

Patricia Farrell, Edge Hill University: The Expressive Tension between Text and Painting in the work of Pete Clarke

My paper will interrogate the effects for reading of the transposition of text onto an a-linguistic surface, focussing on the recent collaborative series of prints produced by the visual artist Pete Clarke and the poet Robert Sheppard.

Peter Gillies, University of Plymouth: Scrawling Across an Open Field: Cy Twombly’s Inverted Ekphrasis

This paper will discuss the influence of Charles Olson’s poetics on the work of CyTwombly. It will examine how Twombly connects word to image, writing to drawing, and the historical to the contemporary, while inverting the ekphrastic act in the process of composition.

Juha Virtanen, University of Kent: ‘Memories arrested in space’: Eric Mottram’s Pollock Record

Calum Rodger, University of Glasgow: Writing Between Arts: Ekphrasis in Concrete Poetry

If ekphrasis is the imitation of a plastic art in literature, then how does it operate in concrete poetry, a literature that is already plastic? This paper will provide an answer to this question, drawing support from, among others, the structural linguistics of Roman Jakobson and the remarkable ekphratic poems of Ian Hamilton Finlay.

Defne Cizakca, Nikki Cameron, Sherezade Garcia Rangel, University of Glasgow: Writing Hidden Objects: The Hunterian Museum as a Place of Inspiration

Eddie Tay, Chinese University of Hong Kong: In Hong Kong, In Medias Res: On Beginnings, Intentions and Methods of an Ongoing Poetry and Street Photography Project

Stephen Vincent, San Francisco: Visual art that ‘reads’ poetry.

Louis Goddard, University of Cambridge: De Kooning, O’Hara, Prynne: Towards a Poetics of Paint

What might it mean for a painting to have been influenced by a poem, and, further, for a contemporary poet to write about this process of influence? These questions will be examined in relation to a lecture by the British poet J.H. Prynne which puts forward a connection between Frank O’Hara’s ‘Ode to Willem de Kooning’ (1957) and de Kooning’s Rosy-Fingered Dawn at Louse Point (1963).

Jeannette Siebols, Sydney, Australia: ‘Writing the Painting’

Poetry divested of its linguistic role becomes the language of silence. In this presentation of
paintings, poetry is made visible and ventures where the spoken word can never go.

Simon PerrilDe Montfort University, Leicester: Synaptic foliage: Notes towards a poetics of collage as conductive practice (the dialogue between poems and visual collage).

Lesley Harrison, University of Aberdeen: Ecstatics : a language of birds.

‘Ecstatics’ (Brae Editions, Orkney) was a collaboration between poet Lesley Harrison and artist Laura Drever, and won the 2012 National Library of Scotland award for poetry publishing. Lesley discusses common elements in their creative methods, and how the acts of drawing and writing moulded each other to create a new, homogenous artistic work.

Laurence Figgis, University of Glasgow / Glasgow School of Art: ‘Something that was not a bird’: The Uses of Transformation in Contemporary Ekphrasis

Professor Tracy Mackenna, Edwin Janssen, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, University of Dundee: ‘Peddling Prints and Poems: activating the textual, the oral and the visual’.

The Pedlar character repositions and activates anew relationships between performer and audience, art object and society, from within the site of an art practice that occupies multiple public platforms.

Mark Leahy, University of Falmouth: “it is the act and not the object of perception that matters”: Thomas MacGreevy’s poetry in relation to perception in literary and visual arts.

John McAuliffe, University of Manchester: Hearing Things: Sound and Form in Derek Mahon’s Ekphrastic Poems

Sheree Mack, The Open University: The Black Woman in the View Finder: Reflections on the Visual in the Writing of Contemporary Black British Women Poets.

Chris Kerr, Cambridge: Ekphrasis and Ian Hamilton Finlay’s ‘Starlit Waters’

A poetical response to Finlay’s work, flat pack typography and the Iliad, featuring ekphrastic revolutions and the bathos of constellations.

Judy Kendall, University of Salford: Understanding Visual Text: neither a poem nor a painting be

Visual text – the creative collision when dynamically different processes of reading and viewing text and image collide and/or unite.

Alistair Peebles, University of Northumbria: Blossom and Farewell (Working Title)

Andrew Brown, University of Exeter: The Fool and the Physician

Ken Cockburn and ~in the fields: ‘Composite Landscapes’

Since 2008, poet Ken Cockburn and the artists ~ in the fields have collaborated on several projects, including a publication, an exhibition and public art projects. We will consider the different approaches to writing these  projects suggested, in terms of our collaborative methods, as well as the ways in which the content, form and sequencing of the resultant texts developed.

Tilo Reifenstein, Manchester Metropolitan University: Transposition Im/Possible

Translating images into words and words into images is as necessary and possible as it is impossible. Re-imagining the relation between the intersemiotic transposition of (reverse) ekphrasis and translation proper through Derrida’s four reasons for the impossibility of translation.

Laura Edbrook, University of Glasgow: I Am Not 

Agents in disguise and assigned to discreet inquiries, we occasionally recognise each other.

I Am Not, is a multitext essay-film constructed in three parts (Knot 1, Knot 2 and Knot 3). Laura Edbrook will present Knot 1 as a work in progress. The film will address language and its potential visual forms; and visual forms and their potential readable narrative, exploring the conflicts between storytelling and formal experimentation.

Linda Carreiro, University of Calgary, Canada: texte à tissue, text at issue: exploring embodiment in word-based visual art

Roland Barthes, in The Pleasure of the Text, reminds readers that text (texere) means tissue, drawing immediate connections to the thread of words, and to the fabric of the human form. Building upon my own long-term involvement in anatomical study and in word-based art practice, this paper will discuss how my alteration of literary works from flattened pages into intricate, paper sculptures, enables text to be experienced as palpable, sensate material—invoking the bodies of both maker and reader.

Kyra Pollitt, University of Bristol: Visual art as the text for writing into iconotexts? The curious case of sign language poetry.

David Kennedy, University of Hull: Ekphrasis, Translation and Utopia

Drawing on and developing arguments in his recent study The Ekphrastic Encounter in Contemporary British Poetry and Elsewhere (Ashgate, 2012), Kennedy explores how ekphrasis might be understood as a type of translation that, like all translation, is convergent with ideas about utopia. Lawrence Venuti has suggested that translation is a utopian project because ‘it is filled with the anticipation that a community will be created around that text’ and because it ‘projects a utopian community that is not yet realized.’ Kennedy uses these ideas to discuss both Venuti’s own translation of Catalan poet Ernest Farrés’s book of poems about the paintings of Edward Hopper and British poet Kelvin Corcoran’s two sequences on post-war British sculpture, the work of YBAs and painter Roger Hilton. He argues that Farrés/Venuti imagine a community that is absent from Hopper’s paintings while Corcoran looks back to the 1940s and 1950s for cultural ‘roads not taken’.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

A WEEK TO GO UNTIL THE CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE!!

Email kinloch.david1@gmail.com with your proposals!

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The relationship between literature and the visual arts has a long and complex history which includes poets responses to iconic works of art such as Keats’s ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’ and notable collaborations between artists and poets such as those between Auden and Henry Moore and, more recently, Philip Gross and Simon Denison. Beyond poetry, the tales of Saki and Vernon Lee and the fiction of A. S. Byatt feature descriptions of fictional works of art.

This AHRC sponsored conference responds to a renewed interest among both theorists and practitioners, an interest signaled by a rise in ‘picture poems’, numerous collaborations between poets and artists and a recent crop of critical books on poetry and the visual arts by, among others, Stephen Cheeke, David Kennedy and Liliane Louvel.

Writing into Art is aimed particularly at poets and writers in general interested in ekphrasis and at visual artists whose work involves the use of text. While the emphasis will be on practice-led responses to the visual arts, academics with an interest in experimental theoretical  models are also welcome. Papers may be in traditional academic format but we are happy to consider alternative approaches such as brief presentations of work in progress accompanied by critical reflection. We would be particularly interested in joint papers on artist/poet collaborations.

Keynote speakers will include the award winning American poet and translator, Cole Swensen noted for her response to the visual art traditions of America and France and British poet and critic, David Kennedy whose most recent book The Ekphrastic Encounter in Contemporary British Poetry and Elsewhere surveys contemporary poetry that responds to the visual arts from a range of theoretical perspectives.

The conference programme combines critical and creative practice. The afternoon of the second day of the conference will be devoted to two practice-based workshops that will elicit responses to the collections at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery, one led by Cole Swensen, the other by a leading British artist.

Potential topics for papers might include but are not limited to:

>Ekphrasis as practice-led research

>Visual art that ‘reads’ poetry

>Ekphrasis and craft

>Ekphrasis and form

>Ekphrasis as translation           

>Ekphrasis and new media

>Ekphrasis and pedagogy

>Ekphrasis and the poetic sequence

>Artist/poet collaborations: challenges and rewards

>The role of works of art in art in modern and contemporary fiction.

Proposals for 20 minute papers exploring aspects of ekphrasis are invited. Please send abstracts of no more than 600 words plus a short biography to kinloch.david1@gmail.com

Deadline for abstracts is 5 January 2013. We will inform participants of acceptance by 1 February.

To encourage postgraduate participation a prize of £100 will be awarded to each of the three best abstracts submitted by a postgraduate student. Please include details of your University or College affiliation and your student registration number in your biography.

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A Little Reminder…

It’s a month until the CALL FOR PAPERS deadline!

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Recent News…

The visual arts workshop on day 2 of the conference will be led by artist & teacher Tom Chambers (MBE), in association with The Steven Campbell Trust. More details will be provided in due course.

The fundamental aim of the Trust is to broaden creative thinking and output in both individuals and communities of practice in a manner reflecting the eclectic and imaginative works of the late Steven Campbell. The Trust supports students, young creative artists, undergraduates, postgraduates and mid-career artists to develop their education, training and research skills as well as improving the individual’s capabilities, skills and understanding. The work of the Trust also covers the provision of artistic events at local, national, international and professional level to encourage high standards in the arts, culture and education.

For further info on the Trust and Tom Chambers, look under THE STEVEN CAMPBELL TRUST and TOM CHAMBERS (MBE) respectively.

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